Canterbury Area
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Culpepper Places
Canterbury (Kent) Area of England

Canterbury Area Index

Separate Pages

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Faversham

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Hackington (St. Stephens)

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Canterbury (Under construction)

Miscellaneous Places at Bottom of this Page

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Aldington-Lympne

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Barfreston

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Beakesbourne

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Chartham

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Elmsted

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Hoath-Herne

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Littlebourne

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Nonington

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Preston

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Stowting

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Swalecliff

Miscellaneous Places

Temporary holding area for bits and pieces of text and links until research is completed and pages developed for each place.

Aldington-Lympne, Kent (West)

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Falconhurst. This but little known house from a family of Falconer, in Edward VI reign, in the possession of Thomas Culpeper.
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. Martin, Aldington (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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St. Stephen's Church, Lympne
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church.












Photograph furnished by Keith Pearce, January 2011

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
ALDINGTON, a parish partly in the liberty of ROMNEY-MARSH, but chiefly in the franchise and barony of BIRCHOLT, lathe of SHEPWAY, county of KENT, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from Hythe: the former part contains 7 inhabitants, and the latter 728. The church, dedicated to St. Martin, displays the early style of English architecture, in its general structure; but, among later additions, is a finely ornamented window of five lights.

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Lympne. Pronounced "Limm", Lympne is a former Roman port which was called Portus Lemanis. The Romans built a fort here in the 3rd century. It has been the victim of erosion and neglect, but the remains now known as Studfall Castle, can be visited. Only about 300 yards from there is Lympne Castle, a fortified manor house originally built in the 14th century. It was largely rebuilt in this century but retains its original character. From the castle are far-reaching views over the Romney marsh, the Royal Military Canal and the Channel. (Hidden Places of Kent.)

Barfreston, Kent

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Fairfax Harrison: "In the course of this last duty William10 moved his residence several times, which explains why his third son, Martin, was entered at Winchester (Kirby, supra) as 'of Barfriston' in east Kent. It follows that it was not until the very end of his life that William settled down at Wigsell.

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St. Mary's Church (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
BARFRESTON, a parish in the hundred of EASTRY, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 6 miles (S. by E.) from Wingham, containing 115 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, presents a fine specimen of Norman architecture, especially in the southern porch, which is richly ornamented with varied moldings. (Besides the church of Barfreston, which is one of the most perfect specimens of pure Saxon in the kingdom, the following are worthy of notice for their antiquity or curiosity, viz., St. Mary's Dover, and those of Maidstone, Minster, Patrixbourne, Reculver, Romney, and Sandwich.)

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A maze of lanes deters heavy traffic from entering Barfreston, a handsome village in the farming country lying just north of the Lyminge Forest. The immediate vicinity was once the site of several collieries, which operated until the Second World War. Nature has taken over again, however, and the dominant feature in the surrounding landscape is farming. Barfreston's small Norman parish church is worth a special visit. It is remarkable for its stone carvings, the best of which are around the east door, representing an array of creatures, scenes of Medieval life and religious symbols. Visitors can obtain an explanatory leaflet from the pub opposite. There is another curious feature of the church - the church bell is attached to a yew tree in the churchyard. (The Hidden Places of Kent)

Beakesbourne, Kent

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Whitefriars. Granted to George Harper, Esq. in 33 Henry VIII (circa 1542), he alienated Whitefriars, Canterbury the next year to Thomas Culpeper of Bekesborne (otherwise unidentified) who two years later passed them away to Thomas Browne. (Hasted II-147)
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. Peter's Church (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
BEAKSBOURNE, a parish within the Cinque-Port liberty of HASTINGS, of which it is a member, though locally in the hundred of BRIDGE and PETHAM, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 3½ miles (E.S.E.) from Canterbury, containing 311 inhabitants. The church is dedicated to St. Peter.

Chartham, Kent

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Howfield came to Mary Hales, co-heir of John Hales. She entitled to her husband, Alexander Culpeper, Esq.  He left an only daughter, Anne (Family Tree only shows her as "Anne" with no father), who carried it into marriage to Sir John Culpeper12 of Wigsell. He alienated it to the Fanes circa 1630.
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. Mary's Church
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church.













Photograph furnished by Keith Pearce, January 2011

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
CHARTHAM, a parish in the hundred of FELBOROUGH, lathe of SCRAY, county of KENT, 3½ miles (S.W. by W.) from Canterbury, containing, with the chapelry of Horton, which is situated in the hundred of Bridge and Petham, 855 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is of early decorated architecture, with very fine windows and some remains of richly stained glass: the roof is of wood and the tower of flint, both being of later date than the stone work: in the chancel lie the remains of Dr. John Reading, chaplain to Charles I, and author of some religious tracts. The river Stour, which is crossed near the village by an ancient bridge of five arches, called Shalmsford bridge, passes through the parish. Numerous tumuli, raised over the slain in the decisive conflict between Cęsar and Cassivelaunus, lie thickly scattered at about three quarters of a mile from the church, on the road to Canterbury, on opening which, urns, fibulę, &c. have been discovered.

Elmsted, Kent

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Elmsted Manor During the reign of Henry VIII, the Manor of Elmsted was in possession of William Haut of Bishopbourne, who left two daughters as co-heirs. Elizabeth married Thomas Culpeper of Bedgebury who became possessed of it. Passed by sale to Richard Hardres.
(Hasted 8-41)
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. James the Great, Elmsted (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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1831 Topographical Dictionary of England
ELMSTED, a parish in the hundred of STOUTING, lathe of SHEPWAY, county of KENT, 8 miles (E. by N.) from Ashford, containing 454 inhabitants. The church is dedicated to St. James.

Hoath-Herne, Kent

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Ford Manor. Elizabeth, daughter of William Hawte who lived during the reign of Henry VIII, carried Ford Manor to her husband, Thomas Culpeper of Bedgebury, who exchanged the manor with the Archbishop of Canterbury for other premises.
National Grid Coordinates: TR 207 657
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
HERNE, a parish in the hundred of BLEANGATE, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 5¾ miles (N.E. by N.) from Canterbury, containing 1675 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Martin, has a tower and other portions in the early style of English architecture, with insertions in the later and decorated styles. In the channel near the bay, numerous fragments of Roman earthenware have been found, supposed to be the vestiges of a cargo of pottery wrecked whilst the Romans were in Britain.

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St Martin of Tours, Herne (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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Holy Cross Church, Hoath. (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

Littlebourne, Kent

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Wingate. Henry VIII granted Wingate to Sir Christopher Hales. His youngest daughter Mary entitled her husband Alexander Culpeper, Esq. to it, in which name it continued until 22 Elizabeth when it was sold to Thomas Fane. (Hasted IV-147)
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. Vincent's Church.
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church.













Photograph furnished by Keith Pearce, January 2011

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1831 Topographical Dictionary
LITTLEBOURN, a parish in the hundred of DOWNHAMFORD, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 4¼ miles (E.) from Canterbury, containing 698 inhabitants. The church is dedicated to St. Vincent. A branch of the river Stour passes by the village.

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Include Hidden Places of Kent page 172.

Nonington, Kent

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St. Albans Court. Mary Hales, one of three co-heirs, carried St. Albans Court to her husband, Alexander Culpeper, who alienated it to his eldest brother, Sir Thomas Culpeper of Bedgebury, who sold it in 3 William and Mary (circa 1692) to Hammond. (Hasted 9-255)
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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St. Mary the Virgin (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

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1831 Topographical Dictionary of England
NONINGTON, a parish in the hundred of WINGHAM, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 4¼ miles (S. by E.) from Wingham, containing 730 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is principally in the early style of English architecture.

Preston, Kent

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Macknar (Makenade). Property of Thomas Culpeper of Bedgebury in late Henry VIII.
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

Stowting, Kent

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St. Mary the Virgin (Photograph wanted)
The Rev. Richard Alleyne, D.D. (1572-1651) was the Vicar of Stouting and the father of Margaret Alleyne. Margaret married the Rev. William Culpeper of Wichling and they are the progenitors of the Culpepers of Barbados. We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church.

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1831 Topographical Dictionary:
STOUTING, a parish in the hundred of STOUTING, lathe of SHEPWAY, county of KENT, 8 miles (E. by S.) from Ashford, containing 236 inhabitants. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is principally in the early style of English architecture. The parish is bounded on the east by the Roman Stane-street, and a branch of the river Stour rises here. In the neighbourhood is a mound overgrown with wood, around which was a double moat, but the origin of it is now buried in obscurity. Some urns and Roman coins have been discovered in this parish.

Swalecliffe, Kent

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Swalecliff Manor. During reign of Henry VIII, Mary, daughter of Sir Christopher Hales, entitled Whitstaple (Whitstable) to her husband, Alexander Culpeper in whose name it continued until 22 Elizabeth when it was passed to Thomas Fane. (Hasted 8-520)
(If this house is still standing, a photograph is desired.)

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1831 Topographical Dictionary of England
SWALECLIFFE, a parish in the hundred of BLEANGATE, lathe of ST. AUGUSTINE, county of KENT, 6½ miles (N.) from Canterbury, containing 143 inhabitants. The church is dedicated to St. John the Baptist.

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St. John the Baptist, Swalecliff (Photograph wanted)
We have not yet determined if any Culpepers appear in monuments or registers of this church

Last Revised: 28 Jan 2011

 

 
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